Podcast 90 – Mind of the Resuscitationist Series: Cliff Reid’s Own the Resus Room

Cliff Reid is the prototypical resuscitationist; he rocks! He has discussed his philosophies on previous episodes:

And of course, Cliff’s blog, resus.me, is some of the best retrieval and resuscitation information around.

I brought Cliff up to speak in my Critical Care Track at the 2012 Essentials of Emergency Medicine. Mel Herbert was kind enough to give me permission to post the lecture here. I think you’ll love it as much as I do.

Need the audio-only version of Cliff’s talk? Right click the link and choose save-as.

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Comments

  1. Really nice 15 minute talk by a master clinician on the essentials of “owning the Resus room”. Highly motivating speaker. Thank you for presenting this.

  2. Frank Hansen MD says:

    A Nice talk. Ón a subject you must use alot of time ón to master in full.

  3. Felipe Teran MD says:

    This is one of the best – simple but yet comprehensive – well delivered and motivating lectures I`ve seen in long time on a topic that is probably the essence of our specialty. Thanks much for putting it up. Regretting not making it to Essentials…

  4. Don Diakow says:

    Borrowed a few “lines of wisdom” from this exceptional presentation to positively motivate some of my crews this tour. Thank-you Doctor Reid well-done!

  5. Just a little bit more motivated after watching this video :).
    Nice job!

  6. Curious which studies are referred to about paramedics and controlling their environments? This matches my own ideas closely, but I’d love to see what work has been done.

  7. Awesome podcast!!! I am a paramedic and medical student and your EM Crit podcasts should be mandatory for those in EM or CC. I was surprised to hear in NYC that ambulances would take someone to a facility based upon geographic location and not resources available. In Oklahoma, EMS destination protocols rate each hospital in the specialities such as neuro, cardiac, peds, etc. They are even categorized into which ones are cardiac arrest receiving facilities. An ambulance could be across the street from a hospital, but patients are taken only to facilities that have the capabilities of managing their condition. It is not uncommon for ambulance to drive past a hospital in order to deliver a patient to a hospital that has the extensive resources to manage their condition. The medical oversight ensures that patients are directed to the right hospital. Obviously the exception, is an airway that cannot be maintained.

    • Thanks brother. NYC has stroke centers, cardiac arrest centers, STEMI centers, trauma centers, and peds centers. I believe it was Cliff’s place that wasn’t bypassed.

      • William Murry says:

        Sorry, I misunderstood! I thought you had mentioned a hospital close to yours received ambulance patients that might need a more comprehensive care just because they were “closer”. I wish Oklahoma that the facilities that NYC. I just meant they were broken down into those categories. Sorry for the misunderstanding.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Over the years we have been faced with several extremely unwell patients who present from nightclubs/saunas/bars with hyperthermia which is suspected to be drug-induced. These cases are rare, but can be extremely challenging to the resuscitationist. […]

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